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Report: Teams miffed about Packers placing Rodgers on IR again

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) looks to pass as Carolina Panthers outside linebacker Thomas Davis (58) and defensive tackle Kawann Short (99) defend in the fourth quarter recently at Bank of America Stadium. (Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports)

The Sports Xchange

Several teams complained to the NFL last week that the Green Bay Packers violated the rules regarding injured reserve, and that the team should have to release two-time NFL MVP Aaron Rodgers as a result, ESPN reported on Sunday.

Rodgers was activated off injured reserve and played last week against the Carolina Panthers. The 34-year-old exited the contest because he was "sore," according to Packers coach Mike McCarthy.

Green Bay announced its decision to place Rodgers back on injured reserve Tuesday, after the Packers had been eliminated from a potential postseason berth. Had the Atlanta Falcons lost to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Monday night, the Packers might have opted against shutting down Rodgers.

NFL rules stipulate that a player needs to have sustained a new injury that would sideline him at least six weeks to be placed on injured reserve. Should that not be the case, the team is obligated to release the player once he is healthy.

Rodgers, who sustained a broken right clavicle against the Minnesota Vikings on Oct. 15, was not believed to have sustained a new injury prior to being placed back on IR. He completed 26 of 45 passes for 290 yards and had three touchdown passes opposite three interceptions against the Panthers.

Per ESPN, the NFL referred all inquiries from other teams to the Packers, who have declined comment.

Rodgers passed for 1,675 yards, 16 touchdowns and six interceptions over seven games this season, his 13th in the NFL.

Rodgers ranks second all-time in franchise history in passing yards (38,502) and touchdowns thrown (313), trailing only the legendary Brett Favre in both categories (61,655 and 442, respectively).

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